Ocular fundus examination can lead to life- and vision-saving interventions1. Improve crucial retinal exams in neurology with Optomed handheld fundus camera.

 

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    Aurora IQ fundus eye

    Get the BIG picture

    Optomed Aurora® IQ handheld fundus camera enables a detailed non-mydriatic examination of the ocular fundus with a high-resolution image.

    The image can be taken by non-physician staff, further integrated into the hospital system, and used for treatment follow-up.

    Aurora IQ benefits in neurology

    Improve papilledema detection

    Detecting papilledema through an undilated pupil with traditional direct ophthalmoscopy is extremely difficult, and critical retinal findings might be left undetected. Non-mydriatic fundus photography can replace direct ophthalmoscopy in many settings, allowing faster and more accurate diagnosis of various neurologic and systemic disorders.1,4

    Man holding his head

    Detecting papilledema with Optomed Aurora IQ in acute neurology patients

    Patient with headache, hypertensive crisis or other neurological deficit comes into a clinic

    To rule out more severe underlying cause for the neurologic condition examine optic disc rapidly with Aurora IQ

    Save fundus image electronically to medical records, and send image for consultation if needed

    Detect presence or absence of papilledema or other acute retinal changes immediately and determine treatment plan

    Sources: 1) Mackay DD, Garza PS, Bruce BB, Newman NJ, Biousse V. The demise of direct ophthalmoscopy: A modern clinical challenge. Neurol Clin Pract. 2015;5(2):150-157. 2) Alm M, Hautala N, Bloigu R, Huhtakangas J. Comparison of optic disc evaluation methods in neurology emergency patients. Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Dec;140(6):449-451. 3) Pérez MA, Bruce BB, Newman NJ, Biousse V. The use of retinal photography in nonophthalmic settings and its potential for neurology. Neurologist. 2012 Nov;18(6):350-5. 4) Biousse V, Bruce BB, Newman NJ. Ophthalmoscopy in the 21st century: The 2017 H. Houston Merritt Lecture. Neurology. 2018;90(4):167-175.